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20121027
20121104
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CSPAN2 15
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English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
arm of the nation's defense. but in the daily activities that we conduct, we do a lot of things that are important not only to the members of the military and the members of this country, but that have a significant effort in advancing the well-being of others in the world. so, we tend to think of the obvious things. we stand for freedom of choice. we stand for people being able to go about their lives free from oppression and things we know a lot about. but in the process of doing that, we had a large group of people and the department of defense. they need medical care, and because many of them are working at a very high operations tempo and under a lot of stress, we want them to be in the absolute highest level of health that we can possibly provide. and so, we have a very, very healthy group of folks, and we work overtime to make sure they stay healthy. in the process of doing that, we've learned a lot about people, diseases, physiology and on and on and on. one of the things we have to offer, we in this case i believe being the department of defense in this country is shari
of defense is correct we are doing quarterbacking. if they would tell us more we would quit our monday morning quarterbacking. he didn't have the awareness to commit forces, look he had the situational awareness that the embassy was being attacked -- the consulate was being attacked in benghazi and should have had aircraft over there as soon as possible. john mccain is correct, they didn't have an alert status. we still could have gotten airplanes were armed or not over the consulate annex within probably a couple hours. we should have done that. we didn't even try. we didn't do anything. that is the very disturbing thing. we should have had alert aircraft. first we should have had a global hawk over benghazi and tripoli on 9/11 the anniversary. they announced the day before that we should take radical islamists should take advantage and defeat the americans because they killed binlibbi in afghanistan. we should have had intelligence surveillance and assets right over libya. >> jamie: you are saying we should have begun the operation to protect everyone even before 9/11. we had enough
to this at the highest level, leon panetta, secretary of defense said we don't want to attack iran. we hope that israel will not attack iran. but israel is a sovereign country, and have to make their own decisions about what they will do. you might ask what the reaction would be if you reverse the cast of characters. those of you who have antiquarian interest, you may remember there is a document called "the united nations charter" foundation of modern international law, which bars the threat or use of force in international affairs. there are two rogue states, the nine states and israel, which for him or which regard the charter and international law is just a boring relevance, so do what they like. and that is accepted. these are not just words. there is an ongoing war including terrorism, assassination of nuclear scientists, economic war, u.s. threats which have cut iran out of the international financial system. western military analysts identify what they call weapons of finance as acts of war, the justify violent responses when they are directed against us, that is. the united states is openly ca
and so-called defense. would you agree that we need reform this as well, it is nothing that would save us money their? >> yeah, that's okay. i think that there are two sides of the same equation. rand paul says that we cannot cut the debt or do something to address the deficits without looking at domestic spending and four in spending. that's how we will have to compromise. would you come up from the liberals perspectives they we need to do something with the entitlement system. maybe some way to save money. >> we have done that. obamacare is deficit reduction. it quantifies specifically because a lot of it is experimental. most folks who look at this thing the main drivers of deficit and debt is excessive health care spending. he doesn't deny your health care that you need. the obamacare plan is to try on a bunch of things and see what works the best. let's learn as we go. so it strikes me as very shortsighted. even if you don't like it from the get-go, i was not onboard in 1996, we gave it a shot. in some ways, it worked better than i thought it would. but it was good to try it and see
or a third-party leaks sensitive national defense information, that is really our focus. i mean, i am not aware of cases in my district where an allegation is by the defense or a third party that there was something and toward going on on behalf of the information that was leaked. and so, you know, as ken said, there are numerous structures in place these days for whistleblowers to report information. that is true, even in the justice department. our former inspector general is here, and the hajis have structures in place, have structures in place to receive those kind of allegations of waste, fraud, abuse, you know, illegal activity, what have you. and it seems to me that that is -- that is the proper recourse if the government employee believes that something untoward is going on with the structure of the congress. and i don't think that the justice department would, you know, would necessarily expect to get a referral from an intelligence agency and a case involving this sort of thing. >> let's take a couple of questions from the audience. i ask you to please be sure and to the poi
] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs impact americans? that was submitted by jeff tanguay via facebook. >> the war on drugs has been an u
with the american people in terms of defense. i think you ought to have a 300 ship navy because we are going to be bringing the troops home. >> first of all the president is right when he says you don't count ships you count the effectiveness of the navy and of the entire military force. what romney is doing is he is appealing to the ship building facilities in virginia. it is campaign rhetoric, not a realistic defense. >> eleanor, once again eleanor is right. >> thank you, tim. >> it is military industrial king pinnism. george allen is doing it in virginia and now romney is doing it. >> we need more ships to make more jobs. >> you sound like obama when you are saying we need more ships to make more jobs. >> we do need ships to defend american interests abroad. >> do we have enough as obama says we have? >> i think we ought to modernize the navy and stay at 300 ships but bring the troops out of places like the middle east, central asia, bring them home. >> the current batch of ships we have are so big and so powerful. >> we used to have 15 carriers, we have now got 11. >> so multi-usable we
defense strategy as we try to work through what the roles of the different services are and the defense strategy, i also remind everyone that we are also going to be downsizing during this time. the army, who at the beginning of calendar year 2012 was 570,000, will go down to 490,000 in the active component by the end of 2017. we have significant deployed commitments. we are downsizing our army, and we are now looking to the future. one of the main thing is we have to do is ensure we have the right mix. i always talk about my three rio stats that the secretary of army and i pay a lot of attention to. end strength, modernization, and readiness. because in general terms those are the drivers of our budget. we have to keep those in balance. we want to learn from the lessons of past draw downs. some of the lessons is you can't get out of balance. because if you get out of balance you start to have an unready army. which leads to a hobbled army. we talk about task force smith and its impact and unpreparedness as was asked to go into korea post-world war ii. we don't want that to happen again
's also true that the disclosure of certain highly classified sensitive national defense information security grounds the protect the secrecy of information critical to the national security and the right to free speech and the value of the informed citizenry is not absolute to the nation's security as the fourth circuit said in the u.s. versus morrison they said public security can be compromised and to raise the information is needed for democracy to function and the physical security which a functioning government requires or as the district judge in the district of virginia couple of years ago he wrote to the defendant's first amendment challenge to the espionage statute is the tension between the government transparency so essentials of the space society on the one hand and the government's equally compelling need to protect the disclosure information that could be used by those that wish to do the nation harm. the tension between the two principals, the first principles as i call them is not one that will necessarily resolve this morning but i mention them because it does and f
-- [inaudible] and given that we have very recently, only last night, met with the secretary of defense. would the prime minister meet with me and other interested members to discuss this issue? >> i'm always happy to talk to colleagues about this issue, as i know the ministry of defense and the secretary of state is. as he knows, we've had to make difficult decisions to put in place the future structure of the army with 82,000 regular soldiers and a larger reserve of 32,000 territorial army soldiers. i think that is right. clearly we've had to make some decisions about the regiments and battalions, and we were trying to save as many as possible. i think the proposals have taken that into account but, of course, the defense secretary will go on listening to representations. >> [inaudible] >> mr. speaker, will the prime minister confirm that the changes to child benefit due to be introconstitutioned in january -- introduced in january this year, next year, is -- that the cost of that, the overall cost is very much over 100 million pounds? >> the changes that we are making to child benefit where
. there are some challenges at the aerospace and defense industries , where classified material is to be protected. but in the engineering field, the banking field come in the telecommunications field, the education field and the consulting and providing its services and maintenance and operations and logistics field, the opportunities there limited only by the imagination. could you elaborate a little bit on how this is going in your view and for boeing in particular for seizing this opportunity and taking saudi arabia and students before they returned to the kingdom, where they expected to know a lot more than actually they would know, unless they have the practical hands-on experience. >> well, it's going well in dealing with the initiative of leadership and american firms we are seeing some success. boeing has a london presence as mro facility there in the airport. so they have a foothold to do that. i mention emd. this last summer and across the company summer high your program for students. they've got a 60 plus year presence there, so bill swanson, ceo clearly understands the value. here's
. and a means forgoing these across-the-board defense cuts that, this man heinrich supported so that we don't lose another 20,000 jobs next year. that's what i will do in the united states senate and i look forward to the discussion this evening. >> martin heinrich, your opening statement. heinrich: growing up my dad was an electrician. my mom worked in a factory. they worked hard and stretched every dime but there were still tough times along the way. so, i know what it's like to struggle in a tough economy. and i'm running for the senate because i want our children, yours and mine, to inherit the kind of country that we all believe in growing up. an america where you prosper if you work hard and play by the rules. i want you to know that my priorities are mexico's priorities. protecting social security and medicare. tax cuts for the middle class, keeping our promises to our veterans and making college more affordable for everyone. i come home nearly every weekend so i can hold the job fairs to meet with the mexicans and raise my family. i've always fought for the things that matter most t
saturday morning at 10 eastern on c-span. >> the british defense committee is holding a series of hearings looking into the progress and security situation in afghanistan. tuesday members heard from the british ambassador to nato, the joint forces commander and the deputy commander for nato's afghan training operations. the two-hour hearing focused on several topics including the 2014 timetable for nato and british troops to withdraw from afghanistan. the threat of green on blue attacks and training the afghan forces. nato and u.k.-armed forces have been in afghanistan since october of 2001. this is just under two hours. >> whale come to all of you -- welcome to all of you to evidence session on afghanistan which we are using today to look at what the current state of operations are and who is in afghanistan and how well the after began national security -- afghan national security forces are doing and how well we are going to be planning for withdrawal from afghanistan. and i, therefore, would welcome as full evidence as you are able to give at the current state of planning for all of thi
, the base realignment and closure process, could call for cuts for many defense related programs in massachusetts. if that happens, where would you stand for cuts to trim the deficit, or to prefer pentagon spending and jobs provided for the economy in massachusetts? >> great question. i am still serving in the national guard. i have been there in that capacity. and as a senator, making sure we can provide a good analysis as to what is going on. the jobs are critical. we have a strong defense industry in massachusetts. we need to make sure we can protect them, as well. it will be a challenge. i worked on the first base closure when i was a state senator. i have been fighting and working now, meeting with the personnel. also, at the air force base. to make sure we provide them. as a ranking member of armed services and having the ability to meet with these people and get the information and battle in a consistent basis for them, i am looking forward to that opportunity. as you know, especially, they have a mission where their proficiency is so much better than the active forces, an
absorbing about half those cuts. by one estimate, the defense industry alone could lose more than 300 thousand jobs. and some 2 million already unemployed americans would lose their benefits. news reports say that a bipartisan senate group is already trying to fashion an agreement combining spending cuts with a tax code overhaul to keep the country out of a new recession. >> and just last week chief executives of 80 major corporations urged congress to fashion a deal to reduce the deficit and said that increased tax revenues have to be part of the bargain. but an overwhelming majority of house and senate republicans have signed the norquist no tax pledge. so many observers think the best congress will be able to do is pass a stopgap measure to get the nation through the immediate crisis. >> they have to violate that pledge if you are gonna come up with a resolution of the fiscal cliff that's gonna work. >> norm ornstein is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute and co-author of the new book, "it's even worse than it looks." he says even if congress were somehow to emb
defensive medicine, you're not serious about controlling the cost of health care. >> reporter: montanans call their state big sky country where cows graze peacefully. but this year the state is anything but peaceful. because the road to the senate majority may run through it. barry petersen, cbs news, great falls, montana. >> glor: next on tonight's "cbs evening news," success for space-x as the dragon capsule completes its mission. and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. better taste. better nutrition. better eggs. it's eb. to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jason chose aleve. just two pills for all day pain relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long sinus and headache relief. i was skeptical at first. but after awhile even my girlfriend noticed a difference. [ m
the on a regular basis -- in defense of their friend who are going to be deported to countries they have never known. thee these are dream act students tens and thousands that graduate high school every years. there's a kid brought in to the country at age 2 from honduras. the mom in the mental asigh limb. only when he pays a parking ticket does he find out before going college he's not documented. he didn't know. he's going to be deported. he doesn't speak spanish. we ask people the question, should that person be deported a very different than about -- thing a gracious of the campaigns -- might occur from the individual stories an instrumentally the broader movement bigger national change. so you >> you mention any of the cause are -- is there a conservative an long. >> we see more conservative campaigns. started be conservative. we don't know until we en-- there's a case where in the target ends up about a week before thanksgiving last year they announce that all the workers the first time are going to have to work on thanksgiving. there's a worker in kansas and starts a petition gets 150,0
sure we fully fund the military to make sure we are going to always have the greatest military defense in the world. >> moderator: okay, thank you. mr. morning? morning: well, i'm clearly the peace through strength campaign. i believe that if you look up something like the pet row dollar and tie the fact that our monetary scheme is tied to oil, you'll see a good part of our foreign policy not just in the middle east, but elsewhere is tie today all the of the worst decisions we've made. and i'm opposed to just about anything arrive seen coming out of washington, d.c. for the last 70 years or so. we've not had a year's peace, we've not had a declared war since world war ii. all of that's immoral, and it's not working. i would say that what we ought to be doing is peace, commerce, healthy skepticism with all nations and entangling alliances with none. >> moderator: thank you. mr. donnelly? one minute. donnelly: well, first and foremost, osama bin laden is dead. in regards to iran, they cannot get a nuclear weapon. it is, it is a nonnegotiable point. what you've seen so far with the sancti
defense, had played itself out and that progressives, liberals, we were flat on our back. >> brown: you use this term hand making i implies a sense of craft, a hands-on. your own background i know from being involved in folklore and music. >> yes. i'm a folklorist and amuse i cannologist. that colors my perspective. i reach back for the foundation of my argument to the late 19th century, to that other transition, the industrial revolution, and to the krettics who pushed back against it. and to the critics who pushed back against it. public intellectuals of the day who recognized the cllenges of industrial production and the new reach of capitalism and really tried to present a vision of artisanship and craftsmanship as a kind of alternative. i touch rather lightly on them but i use them as a starting point. >> brown: if you use them and look at cultural problems and then like at the political divisiveness in the situation in politics today, how does it jibe? what exactly are you calling for? >> i think we need to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. if the reader buys my
? for example, it seems to me that they are generally satisfied with defense cooperation and have accepted and cooperated on sanctions, but they have considerable concerns about war and considerable concerns about the consequences of iraq and what our policy is in syria, and certainly palestine. so would anyone like to comment about that? >> can everybody hear me? so, i think part of iran's favor is isolating itself from the neighborhood in terms that particularly the gcc states. under ahmadinejad since 2005, the islamic republic has done a lot to scare everybody in the region, through its nuclear pursued, but a range of other action. when you look at iranian policy before ahmadinejad, there was a tendency to seek some sort of cordial working relationship with the gcc states, including saudi arabia, especially saudi arabia. for example, rafsanjani really trying to be some of the tensions between iran and saudi arabia, followed much more policy toward saudi arabia and the gcc states. of course, the historic and ideological tension between the two sides never went away, but ahmadinejad has m
, dwellings for civilians. >> warner: jeffrey white, a defense fellow at the washington institute for near east policy, says the syrian government is waging a deliberate "scorched earth" strategy. >> it's trying to get at f.s.a. units that are embedded inside the population. where people are, the f.s.a. tends to be. so it is trying to strike at the f.s.a., cause some attrition on them. but it's also trying to punish the people, the civilians, for supporting the f.s.a. the relationship between the f.s.a. units and the people is critical to the success of the rebellion >> warner: why don't the regime forces just go into these areas and take them and hold them? >> it basically can't do that any longer. six months ago, they could go anywhere in the country, effectively, they wanted with armor mechanized forces backed up by artillery, and simply push the f.s.a. out of the area and retake the area and reestablish a presence. the opposition is strong enough now that the regime's ground forces, to go into those areas, is a punishing affair for the regime. >> warner: throughout the conflict, syrian
and that is by your defense, we have to watch out for people who will inevitably make that mistake. you have to have measures in place go back and say, okay, we have to have that kind of auditing thing. >> yes, you have to assume that somebody is going to hit you eventually. it really helps to invest in understanding the tools that we practice using, what those tools look like and put in place pieces that protect them. i just got back from class on how to hack and i took my students through the toolkit, here's everything we did, here's here is what we look like coming here are things and tools that i have. so taking kind of a counter approach to understanding what is being thrown at me, what does it look like and where is the weakness, that is a important thing to. >> we need to make network of vendors of more awareness of what is out there. even the offense of toolkit,. >> one of the things that amplifies leaders in the world, that is hacking networks, let's say, just for example, nasa. hiring a guy like raphael mudge to go in and under a nondisclosure agreement from attacking it like crazy. and fi
this was some famous, recent secretary of defense said the knowns and the unknowns. i am stopping, it's my last sentence. [laughter] i hate when they -- baathist. [laughter] i couldn't help that. i couldn't help that. losing syria, as rumsfeld once said, maybe it's wiser to insist on iraqi compliance. if we ignore baghdad's support for us and the risk of a lingering and endangered civil war and spillover into iraq and elsewhere grows. losing syria as a strategic ally will not cause the collapse of the government in iran, although it could weaken ahmadinejad even more than he's weakening anyway. weakening baghdad by threatening maliki, though, could have a major unintended consequence, and that is this: could push maliki, push him closer to tehran and away from possible rapprochement with iraq's arab neighbors which, in my humble opinion, is not a good idea. thank you. [applause] >> okay, so in my role as non-baathist moderator -- [laughter] inviting abdullahal sham marry -- alshammari to speak. >> thank you, it's a pleasure to speak with you. i should talk about iraq, then about syria, but i th
wash. this season, a good offense is the best defense. lysol. mission for health. . >>> we have breaking news in the east day. a swat team surrounded a house. what's happening? >> reporter: we are onto 500 block of wesley avenue. you can see police crews here from union city just wrap up with their large swat operation here today. as we look at video from earlier today, they -- they were about three he -- about three or four swat cars. the reason why they are here is they are serving some type of search warrant for at least a few people. they say they don't know -- they can't tell us who they are be log for but -- looking for but they are serving search warrants throughout the area. they wouldn't find who they were looking for. let's bring in brandon garland. can you kind of describe the scene. what you saw? >> it was blackout this morning, about five, 5:30. the house back there was looking, for the -- to -- the police officers were be looking for the suspects. the scene was just kind of quiet. . >> reporter: were you nervous? >> little bit nervous wondering why they were at t
's a document about the defense intelligence agency which is the defense department version of the cia. it basically says, our intelligence of weapons of mass destruction is terrible. we really don't know anything. and that is coming out at the same time that the administration is saying these things about, we're going to have mushroom clouds over new york. and so was their intelligence to say that there are weapons of mass destructions? yes. was it did? no. was there a lot of intelligence the other way? yes. one of the things that people forget, we sent the weapons inspectors back in. there with a bunch of you in inspectors and they said, we can't find anything. and that was not viewed as intelligence. that was viewed as let's make fun. and so, you know, it was a bad application of intelligence by people who thought they knew it with the answer was. >> yes. >> it sounds like based on what you say, a lot of the decisions made a based on faulty intelligence. i guess and just wondering, we are we pass the 500. we a lot of things on the rise in. >> actually, one of the more interesting co
defense of the dodd/frank act. remember the financial crisis of 2008 you read of the hundreds of millions of dollars being spent on lobbyist to repeal financial reform. they're not perfect but in place would have limited the financial crisis. basel iii capital and -- requirements and burdens were intended for our big banks would effectively put community banks out of business. interestingly enough former city group executive sandy weill interview on squawk box we should split up investment banking have banks be fed deposit takers have banks not risk the taxpayer dollars for those that are not too big to fail. sheila bair recently concluded the law clearly establishes a framework that allows financial firms to fail while preventing a broader economy and ends two big to fail. finally we could be spent all morning with mats quotes but lot of them have better words. i will conclude the system has become too complex for people to make the mistake of thinking it means the end of the discussion when it is just the beginning of a war. the question is on the table. too little? to much? just write?
, it seems to me they're generally satisfied with defense cooperation and have accepted and cooperated on sanctions, but they have considerable concerns about war and considerable concerns about the consequences of iraq and what our policy is in syria, and certainly palestine. would anyone like to comment about that? >> i'll go first, if you don't mind. can everybody hear me? i think part of iran's failure is isolating itself from its neighbors, particular the g.c.c. states. under ahmadinejad from 2005, the islamic republic has done a lot to scare everybody in the region, so its nuclear pursuits, a range of sanctions. if you look at the policy before ahmadinejad, there was a tendency to seek some sort of cordial working relationship with the g.c.c. states, including saudi arabia, especially saudi arabia. for example, they really tried to ease some of the tension between iran and saudi arabia. he fled a much more con sill tarry policy. of course, the historic and ideological tension between the two sides never went away, but ahmadinejad has management to really exacerbate tensions with
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)